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slice-of-thai.com Thai Language Other Websites for Learning Thai

Other Websites for Learning Thai

Last Update: October 2017

Table of Contents

Introduction

On this page you will find a list of other websites that also help you learn Thai.

If you have or know another website that would be good for this page, please let me know.

thai-language.com

Started by Glenn Slayden in the late 90s, the still-advertising-free thai-language.com hosts a stunning array of helpful pages:

TLC allows you to choose your preferred pronunciation guide for Thai words, just like we do.

Women Learning Thai (and some men too)

Interesting blog by Catherine Wentworth with links to cheat sheets, anthems and poems decoded, interviews with successful Thai learners, cultural blog entries, and a good summary of other Thai-language sites and resources.

Most interestingly, includes the best resource list:

The mother of all lists of free Thai learning resources

And for more advanced learners:

Thai-Thai & Thai-English Study Resources
Unlike me, Catherine does a very good job of keeping her list up to date and chasing down bad/moved links.

thai-notes.com

thai-notes.com is a fairly new site with some cool technology for learning Thai:

thaivisa.com Expat Forums

There's a pretty good Thai Language Forum on the venerable thaivisa.com expat forum, including some long, helpful pinned threads at the top with learning resources. Be warned though that the thaivisa forums are full of bitter old trolls (less so for the language forum, fortunately).

LEXiTRON Software Dictionary

More than a decade ago, the helpful Thai folks at NECTEC developed, and released into the public domain, a 53,000-word English-Thai dictionary and a 35,000-word Thai-English dictionary called LEXiTRON.

You can access the dictionary online at the LEXiTRON website, but if you're going to be looking up more than a few words, it's a whole lot quicker and more pleasant to download the free, Java-based app for Windows Desktop/Laptop computers that LEXiTRON offers, which you can do by choosing "English" on their site, creating an account using the menu at the left, then going to their Download page.

An even easier option is to use one of the many free or almost-free dictionary apps available for iOS and Android. Almost all of the Thai dictionary apps all use the LEXiTRON data, because it is free. The apps are legally required to disclose that their data comes from LEXiTRON, but many don't, which is quite dishonest. But you can usually recognize the LEXiTRON data quickly...

The issue with LEXiTRON is that while it is free and has about 80,000 English-to-Thai entries, it was created by Thai natives for Thai natives. There is enough English that English-natives can also make use of the dictionary, but there is no pronunication guide for us English natives, and you will often find very blatant errors that relate to the designers' non-native understanding of English.

That is why you tend to see the same egregious errors both in mobile apps with built-in Thai dictionaries and also some websites with built-in Thai dictionaries: they are all using the same free dataset to avoid the multiple-person-year effort required to create a new dataset from scratch. LEXiTRON legally requires apps and websites using their dataset to mention LEXiTRON so you may find reference to it somewhere in the app/website.

This is the one thing that sets apart the Talking Thai-English-Thai Dictionary app for iOS, Android, and Windows that I made along with Paiboon Publishing. We designed our dataset from the ground up with the needs of the foreigner learning Thai in mind, and we invested person-years of labor in editing and enhancement.

Royal Institute Dictionary (RID)

The Royal Institute of Thailand publishes the authoritative Thai-Thai dictionary of the Thai language. For decades it has existed in paper form (1436 page, 600 baht, ISBN 974-9588-04-5). Until as late as 2016, the only digital version available (old RID website) was so horribly bug-ridden, with obsolete pre-Unicode technology and whole swathes of words missing and tons of typos (it seems they hired someone to re-type the dictionary!), that it was a shameful departure from the usual top-rate treatment that anything associated with the royal instutution gets in Thailand.

Fortunately, around 2016, with the help of the Thai government agency NECTEC, the RID came into the 20th century with:

Even better, thai-notes.com did an improved web interface to RID 2011 here.

thai2english.com Dictionary

The sleek and functional thai2english.com hosts a friendly online Thai-English-Thai dictionary which, like our website, lets you choose which pronunciation guide system you want to use for Thai words.

The site also has a cool screen where you can paste a paragraph of Thai text and see a phase-by-phrase breakdown of the Thai in the text along with transcription.

The dictionary hosted at least up to February 2009 was based on LEXiTRON, but as of March 2010 seems to be based on a larger dataset, with pronunciation guides added.

Most cool of all was a USD $40 downloadable commercial Windows software dictionary with a greatly expanded version of the website feature set, but strangely as of September 2017 the software seems to have disappeared.

english-thai-dictionary.com

Another clean site (from a Swede apparently), english-thai-dictionary.com has an online, 83,000-word Thai-English dictionary that shows a Paiboon-like pronunciation guide for single words (not sample sentences). The data is based on LEXiTRON.

The site also hosts a Virtual Thai Keyboard for those who don't want to figure out Thai on their computer keyboard.

Longdo Multilingual Thai Dictionary

The Longdo Thai-English-Japanese-German-French dictionary is an ambitious project still under active development, with an online web interface and even some browser plugins you can use to look up words you see on web pages.

Thai 101 Blog

Rikker Dockum created the Thai 101 blog, which has lots of fun tidbits about the Thai language, including explanations of Thai Puns and other wordgames, reviews of Thai movies, more serious posts about the Royal Institute dictionary and its (lack of) progress on the web, as well as posts on advanced linguistic topics such as historical Thai.

Although Rikker has not updated his blog since 2014, the archived posts still contain a lot of key insights on Thai language not seen anywhere else.

SEAsite (NIU) Thai

The sprawling SEAsite from Northern Illinois University contains resources for many south-east asian languages including Thai. SEAsite was one of the first online resources; some of the technology and pages are showing their age but they're still useful for study.

To access the Thai resources, you click on the mysterious Left Door (why not the right?) and get a long list resources such as the famous maanii reader, flashcards, a picture dictionary, recently added cultural information on business Thai, and even an online dictionary independently developed by SEAsite.

Foreign Service Institute (FSI) Language Courses

There are a series of public-domain Thai (and Lao and Cambodian and ...) language courses, created by the US Government in 1970 but apparently still quite useful, that include not only extensive written material but also audio material.

These courses have taken on new life by the efforts of a fearless volunteer Glen D. Fellows, who digitized them onto fsi-language-courses.com in 2006, and then, when that website fell away, continued by another group of fearless volunteers including Rikker Dockum of Thai 101 and Catherine Wentworth of Women Learning Thai at:

https://www.livelingua.com/fsi-language-courses.php

After that work was published, there began a collaborative volunteer effort to add real Thai script to the materials (which currently only use romanized Thai), and to separate out the sound recordings into the individual dialogs and lessons that they go with. Rikker and Catherine are looking for volunteers to "help type out some of the Thai, proofread some of the English, or format some wiki pages." For the latest fruits of that labor, see:

http://thai-notes.com/FSITLC

For more information, see this post and this post.

The Paknam-iverse

The Paknam Web Network, an interlinked network of "family-friendly websites about Thailand" created by Richard Barrow, includes several sites useful to language learners, such as ThailandQA.com, a web forum with several sections on Thai language learning. As of around 2015 Richard took several of his other sites offline, but we hear he might bring them back at some point.

SEAlang and CRCL

Doug Cooper, who created the Bangkok-based Center for Research in Computational Linguistics (CRCL), has amassed many resources of interest to learners and linguists alike.

There is a searchable online Thai-English dictionary that is based on the seminal work of the late Mary Haas, as well as some bilingual texts and searchable text corpora.

In particular, in the SEAlang archives you can read the full-text of some very old PhD theses about Thai grammar (Noss and Gedney) that are probably still to this day the most detailed and in-depth analyses of Thai.

There is also a set of extremely cool technical papers including an amazing paper about how Thais tell their letters apart in different fonts. (Feb 2009 update: the CRCL papers site http://seasrc.th.net/paper/paper.htm is down, but here is a mirror copy).

The SEAlang Lab hosts several online language learning tools which CRCL has been developing over the last few years.

Thai Language Summaries

Some handy one-pagers mostly useful to linguists:

Wikipedia page on Thai Language
Omniglot page on Thai Language

Some interesting papers:

Paper about Thai keyboard standards and how they came about. Thai politicians cannot resist interfering, not even in something as trivial as this!

Other Sites

Here's some other sites I haven't used so much:

If you have or know another website that would be good for this page, please let me know.

Support This SiteIf you have enjoyed this site, here are a few ways that you can help me get time to expand it further:
donate now   Donate Now
Use your credit card or PayPal to donate in support of the site.
get my thai dictionary app
Learn Thai with my Talking Thai-English-Thai Dictionary app: iOS, Android, Windows.
get my thai phrasebook app
Experience Thailand richly with my Talking Thai-English-Thai Phrasebook app.
get my chinese phrasebook app
Visit China easily with my Talking Chinese-English-Chinese Phrasebook app.
get thailand fever
I co-authored this bilingual cultural guide to Thai-Western romantic relationships.
get books or almost anything
Pick a Thai learning book from my list or buy anything at all from Amazon.
See AlsoYou'll probably also like these sites...
allaboutpai.com
A site about Pai, my peaceful home in the mountains of Northern Thailand.
lurkertech: video tech and diversions
Buzzword bingo, bill the borg, MEZ, lurker's guide to video, and Thai, oh my!
mapfling.com: free custom maps with your own labels
Party? Meeting? Request a map, label it yourself, and easily fling it to your friends!
world's stupidest everything
See some of the worst the world has to offer, and add some of your own!
thailand your way
Travel with my friend Nang, who is a great nature, birding, and cultural guide.
jeed illustration
My English-fluent Thai friend Jeed is a freelance illustrator who is available for hire.
CopyrightEntire website copyright 1999-2017 Chris Pirazzi unless otherwise indicated.

License for use:

Support This Site

If you have enjoyed this site, here are a few ways that you can help me get time to expand it further:
donate now   Donate Now
Use your credit card or PayPal to donate in support of the site.
get my thai dictionary app
Learn Thai with my Talking Thai-English-Thai Dictionary app: iOS, Android, Windows.
get my thai phrasebook app
Experience Thailand richly with my Talking Thai-English-Thai Phrasebook app.
get my chinese phrasebook app
Visit China easily with my Talking Chinese-English-Chinese Phrasebook app.
get thailand fever
I co-authored this bilingual cultural guide to Thai-Western romantic relationships.
get books or almost anything
Pick a Thai learning book from my list or buy anything at all from Amazon.
See Also

You'll probably also like these sites...
allaboutpai.com
A site about Pai, my peaceful home in the mountains of Northern Thailand.
lurkertech: video tech and diversions
Buzzword bingo, bill the borg, MEZ, lurker's guide to video, and Thai, oh my!
mapfling.com: free custom maps with your own labels
Party? Meeting? Request a map, label it yourself, and easily fling it to your friends!
world's stupidest everything
See some of the worst the world has to offer, and add some of your own!
thailand your way
Travel with my friend Nang, who is a great nature, birding, and cultural guide.
jeed illustration
My English-fluent Thai friend Jeed is a freelance illustrator who is available for hire.
Copyright

Entire website copyright 1999-2017 Chris Pirazzi unless otherwise indicated.

License for use: