Thai Desserts - slice-of-thai.com
slice-of-thai.com Thai Desserts

On this page you can explore the insanely delicious snacks and desserts available on the street all around Thailand!

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I work on this site in my off hours. Please help me to push aside my day job and work on it more by supporting the site in one of these ways:
donate now   Donate Now
Use your credit card or PayPal to donate in support of the site.
get my thai dictionary app
Learn Thai with my Talking Thai-English-Thai Dictionary app: iOS, Android, Windows.
get my thai phrasebook app
Experience Thailand richly with my Talking Thai-English-Thai Phrasebook app.
get my chinese phrasebook app
Visit China easily with my Talking Chinese-English-Chinese Phrasebook app.
get thailand fever
I co-authored this bilingual cultural guide to Thai-Western romantic relationships.
get books or almost anything
Pick a Thai learning book from my list or buy anything at all from Amazon.

There are many websites about Thai desserts, but they generally focus on non-perishable desserts that they can pawn online, or desserts which can be made in a western kitchen. This site is not about sales or recipes—it's about the mouth-watering delicacies that you will find being sold on street carts all around Thailand. Many of these desserts cost only 2 or 3 baht (10 US cents) each!

I have provided the Thai name and pronunciation, along with an English name I made up for reference. If you prefer a different pronunciation guide system, you can set it here. I would appreciate receiving any corrections, or additional contributions of desserts with photos (I will give you credit on the site), at chris@pirazzi.net. Thanks to Nuti Damrongphatr for many useful tips and corrections.

Coconut Milk Over Gelatin Dessert
[kà-nǒm-wún-gà-tí, kà-nǒm-wún-gà-tí, ขะL-หฺนมR-วุ้นH-กะL-ทิH, khaL-nohmR-woonH-gaL-thiH, kà-nǒm-wóon-gà-tí, ˈkhà ˈnǒm ˈwún ˈkà ˈthí, ˈkʰà ˈnǒm ˈwún ˈkà ˈtʰí, khaL-nomR-wunH-kaL-thiH, ˈkà ˈnǒm ˈwÓOn ˈgà ˈtí, khà-nǒm-wún-kà-thí, kà-nǒm-wún-gà-tí, khà-nǒm-wún-kà-thí]
ขนมวุ้นกะทิ
Coconut Milk Over Gelatin Dessert

A simple but delicious dessert with a layer of white coconut milk and flour over a layer of colored gelatin. Typically the color is natural (green coloring comes from the Pandan leaf (ใบเตย, genus pandanus) that also gives the gelatin a pleasant taste).

Coconut Slices in Gelatin
[kà-nǒm-wún-má-práao, kà-nǒm-wún-má-práao, ขะL-หฺนมR-วุ้นH-มะH-พฺร้าวH, khaL-nohmR-woonH-maH-phraaoH, kà-nǒm-wóon-má-práo, ˈkhà ˈnǒm ˈwún ˈmá ˈphráaw, ˈkʰà ˈnǒm ˈwún ˈmá ˈpʰráːw, khaL-nomR-wunH-maH-phrāoH, ˈkà ˈnǒm ˈwÓOn ˈmá ˈpráo, khà-nǒm-wún-má-phráo, kà-nǒm-wún-má-práao, khà-nǒm-wún-má-phráo]
ขนมวุ้นมะพร้าว
Coconut Slices in Gelatin

Slices of fresh coconut suspended inside a dessert of slightly-sweetened, clear gelatin.

Layered Gelatin and Coconut Milk Dessert
Layered Gelatin and Coconut Milk Dessert
[kà-nǒm-chán, kà-nǒm-chán, ขะL-หฺนมR-ชั้นH, khaL-nohmR-chanH, kà-nǒm-chán, ˈkhà ˈnǒm ˈchán, ˈkʰà ˈnǒm ˈtɕʰán, khaL-nomR-chanH, ˈkà ˈnǒm ˈchún, khà-nǒm-chán, kà-nǒm-chán, khà-nǒm-chán]
ขนมชั้น
Layered Gelatin and Coconut Milk Dessert

Available in an endless variety of colors and depths, this is the classic Thai dessert with layers of coconut milk and colored gelatin. Opaque layers are produced with a bit of flower. Green color, and a delicious flavor, comes naturally from the Pandan leaf (ใบเตย), genus pandanus). Blue or purple color comes from the water morning glory flower (ดอกอัญชัน, clitonea ternatea). Other colors may be natural or artificial.

Pumpkin Stick
[kà-nǒm-fák-tɔɔng, kà-nǒm-fák-tɔɔng, ขะL-หฺนมR-ฟักH-ทองM, khaL-nohmR-fakH-thaawngM, kà-nǒm-fák-tawng, ˈkhà ˈnǒm ˈfák ˈthɔɔŋ, ˈkʰà ˈnǒm ˈfák ˈtʰɔːŋ, khaL-nomR-fakH-thǭŋM, ˈkà ˈnǒm ˈfúk ˈtorng, khà-nǒm-fák-thawng, kà-nǒm-fák-tong, khà-nǒm-fák-thong]
ขนมฟักทอง
Pumpkin Stick

Pumpkin mixed with sugar and flour forms the base of this tasty coconut-sprinkled sweet.

Baked Egg-Bean Cake
[kà-nǒm-mɔ̂ɔ-gɛɛng, kà-nǒm-mɔ̂ɔ-gɛɛng, ขะL-หฺนมR-ม่อF-แกงM, khaL-nohmR-maawF-gaaengM, kà-nǒm-mâw-gaeng, ˈkhà ˈnǒm ˈmɔ̂ɔ ˈkɛɛŋ, ˈkʰà ˈnǒm ˈmɔ̂ː ˈkɛːŋ, khaL-nomR-mǭF-kǣŋM, ˈkà ˈnǒm ˈmôr ˈgairng, khà-nǒm-mâw-kaeng, kà-nǒm-môr-gaeng, khà-nǒm-mô-kaeng]
ขนมหม้อแกง
Baked Egg-Bean Cake

Popular but exceedingly difficult to describe, you'll just have to taste this baked dessert with a crisp, brown upper shell. Ingredients seem to vary. One internet post describes it as "a Thai sweet made of crushed steamed mung bean, egg, and coconut milk [that] is a specialty of Petchburi Province," while a vendor I asked said it can be made with soybeans or just eggs. No matter what the ingredients, it is somewhat of an acquired taste.

Wacky Balls
[kà-nǒm-dtôm, kà-nǒm-dtôm, ขะL-หฺนมR-ต้มF, khaL-nohmR-dtohmF, kà-nǒm-dtôm, ˈkhà ˈnǒm ˈtôm, ˈkʰà ˈnǒm ˈtôm, khaL-nomR-tomF, ˈkà ˈnǒm ˈdtôm, khà-nǒm-tôm, kà-nǒm-dtôm, khà-nǒm-tôm]
ขนมต้ม
Wacky Balls

Wacky and delicious balls made from a flour-sugar mix, sprinkled generously with coconut shavings, these desserts often have a sweet and crunchy filling which may include nuts.

Pork-Stuffed Sago Balls
Pork-Stuffed Sago Balls
[sǎa-kuu-sâi-mǔu, sǎa-kuu-sâi-mǔu, สาR-คูM-ไซ่F-หฺมูR, saaR-khuuM-saiF-muuR, sǎh-koo-sâi-mǒo, ˈsǎa ˈkhuu ˈsây ˈmǔu, ˈsǎː ˈkʰuː ˈsâj ˈmǔː, sāR-khūM-saiF-mūR, ˈsǎh ˈkoo ˈsâi ˈmǒo, sǎa-khuu-sâi-mǔu, sǎa-koo-sâi-mǒo, sǎ-khu-sâi-mǔ]
สาคูไส้หมู
Pork-Stuffed Sago Balls

Odd-looking but delicious, these squishy, translucent white balls are made from an outer casing that starts out life as hard sago pellets (some seem to use hard tapioca pellets) that are soaked in hot water until they become a workable, opaque sheet (although, as you can see, some of the tiny white pellets retain their original shape and give the outer shell texture). The sheet is worked into a ball and wrapped around a filling of pre-cooked pork, peanuts, onions, sugar, salt, soy sauce, and other ingredients. The balls are then briefly boiled or steamed so that the sheet becomes translucent and the whole dessert becomes soft and delicious. The balls are topped with fried garlic and served with lettuce or other vegetables.

Drum-Head Snack
Drum-Head Snack
[kâao-grìiap-bpàak-mɔ̂ɔ, kâao-grìap-bpàak-mɔ̂ɔ, ค่าวF-เกฺรียบL-ปากL-ม่อF, khaaoF-griiapL-bpaakL-maawF, kâo-grèeap-pbàhk-mâw, ˈkhâaw ˈkrìap ˈpàak ˈmɔ̂ɔ, ˈkʰâːw ˈkrìːap ˈpàːk ˈmɔ̂ː, khāoF-krīapL-pākL-mǭF, ˈkâo ˈgrèe-ap ˈbpàhk ˈmôr, khâo-krìap-pàak-mâw, kâao-grìap-bpàak-môr, khâo-krìap-pàk-mô]
ข้าวเกรียบปากหม้อ
Drum-Head Snack

This tasty dessert has the same filling as "Pork-Stuffed Sago Balls" above, but instead of being surrounded by a thick skin made from sago/tapioca pellets, it is surrounded by a super-thin skin made from rice flour or tapioca flour and steamed on the unmistakable "drum-head" (literally "pot-mouth"), a sheet of thin material stretched over the top of a pot that gently cooks the dessert. It's easy to spot the "drum head" in markets all over Thailand.

Images stolen from a momypedia webboard (top) and the bloggang blog of user หลานยายจุล.

Jackfruit "Seeds"
[kà-nǒm-mét-kà-nǔun, kà-nǒm-mét-kà-nǔun, ขะL-หฺนมR-เม็ดH-ขะL-หฺนูนR, khaL-nohmR-metH-khaL-nuunR, kà-nǒm-mét-kà-nǒon, ˈkhà ˈnǒm ˈmét ˈkhà ˈnǔun, ˈkʰà ˈnǒm ˈmét ˈkʰà ˈnǔːn, khaL-nomR-metH-khaL-nūnR, ˈkà ˈnǒm ˈmét ˈkà ˈnǒon, khà-nǒm-mét-khà-nǔun, kà-nǒm-mét-kà-nǒon, khà-nǒm-mét-khà-nǔn]
ขนมเม็ดขนุน
Jackfruit "Seeds"

Named for their resemblance to jackfruit seeds, these tiny desserts are a sugary delight.

Like the other three golden desserts below, the outside is made from egg yolk mixed with a bit of flour and cooked in condensed syrup. These sweets are important in marriage and housewarming (ขึ้นบ้านใหม่, [kʉ̂n-bâan-mài, kʉ̂n-bâan-mài, คึ่นF-บ้านF-ไหฺม่L, kheunF-baanF-maiL, kêun-bâhn-mài, ˈkhʉ̂n ˈbâan ˈmày, ˈkʰɯ̂n ˈbâːn ˈmàj, khưnF-bānF-maiL, ˈkêun ˈbâhn ˈmài, khêun-bâan-mài, kêun-bâan-mài, khûen-bân-mài]) ceremonies since the golden color (and the Thai word ทอง, [tɔɔng, tɔɔng, ทองM, thaawngM, tawng, ˈthɔɔŋ, ˈtʰɔːŋ, thǭŋM, ˈtorng, thawng, tong, thong] "gold" in the names below) evokes weath and luck for the host of the ceremonies.

Helpful reader Nuti Damrongphatr adds another interesting fact: "real" ancient Thai desserts never contained egg yolk (they contained flour, rice, sticky rice, beans, sugar, coconut meat and milk). Egg yolks were introduced around 1682 by Maria Guyomar de Pinha, a Thai citizen of Japanese-Portuguese-Benghali ancestry who became highly influential in the court of King Narai and who created the golden desserts by starting with some Portuguese recipes and replacing some of the ingredients.

Unlike the three other golden desserts below, Jackfruit "Seeds" are often filled with a little bit of bean paste (the same paste used in bean cakes). To make these dessers, Thai chefs start by rolling the bean paste into the desired shape, drop the paste into the egg yolk, then boil the "seed" in the boiling syrup.

Golden Fibers
[kà-nǒm-fɔ̌ɔi-tɔɔng, kà-nǒm-fɔ̌ɔi-tɔɔng, ขะL-หฺนมR-ฝอยR-ทองM, khaL-nohmR-faawyR-thaawngM, kà-nǒm-fǎwy-tawng, ˈkhà ˈnǒm ˈfɔ̌ɔy ˈthɔɔŋ, ˈkʰà ˈnǒm ˈfɔ̌ːj ˈtʰɔːŋ, khaL-nomR-fǭiR-thǭŋM, ˈkà ˈnǒm ˈfǒi ˈtorng, khà-nǒm-fǎwy-thawng, kà-nǒm-fǒi-tong, khà-nǒm-fǒi-thong]
ขนมฝอยทอง
Golden Fibers

Quite a sight to behold, this super-bright orange dessert consisting of bunches of thin, beautiful fibers is made from the same egg yolk mixture as the shell of the Jackfruit "Seeds" (ขนมเม็ดขนุน, [kà-nǒm-mét-kà-nǔun, kà-nǒm-mét-kà-nǔun, ขะL-หฺนมR-เม็ดH-ขะL-หฺนูนR, khaL-nohmR-metH-khaL-nuunR, kà-nǒm-mét-kà-nǒon, ˈkhà ˈnǒm ˈmét ˈkhà ˈnǔun, ˈkʰà ˈnǒm ˈmét ˈkʰà ˈnǔːn, khaL-nomR-metH-khaL-nūnR, ˈkà ˈnǒm ˈmét ˈkà ˈnǒon, khà-nǒm-mét-khà-nǔun, kà-nǒm-mét-kà-nǒon, khà-nǒm-mét-khà-nǔn]) above.

Golden Drops
[kà-nǒm-tɔɔng-yɔ̀ɔt, kà-nǒm-tɔɔng-yɔ̀ɔt, ขะL-หฺนมR-ทองM-หฺยอดL, khaL-nohmR-thaawngM-yaawtL, kà-nǒm-tawng-yàwt, ˈkhà ˈnǒm ˈthɔɔŋ ˈyɔ̀ɔt, ˈkʰà ˈnǒm ˈtʰɔːŋ ˈjɔ̀ːt, khaL-nomR-thǭŋM-yǭtL, ˈkà ˈnǒm ˈtorng ˈyòrt, khà-nǒm-thawng-yàwt, kà-nǒm-tong-yòt, khà-nǒm-thong-yòt]
ขนมทองหยอด
Golden Drops

These drops are made from the same egg yolk mixture as the shell of the Jackfruit "Seeds" (ขนมเม็ดขนุน, [kà-nǒm-mét-kà-nǔun, kà-nǒm-mét-kà-nǔun, ขะL-หฺนมR-เม็ดH-ขะL-หฺนูนR, khaL-nohmR-metH-khaL-nuunR, kà-nǒm-mét-kà-nǒon, ˈkhà ˈnǒm ˈmét ˈkhà ˈnǔun, ˈkʰà ˈnǒm ˈmét ˈkʰà ˈnǔːn, khaL-nomR-metH-khaL-nūnR, ˈkà ˈnǒm ˈmét ˈkà ˈnǒon, khà-nǒm-mét-khà-nǔun, kà-nǒm-mét-kà-nǒon, khà-nǒm-mét-khà-nǔn]) above, but do not have a filling.

Golden Flowers
[kà-nǒm-tɔɔng-yìp, kà-nǒm-tɔɔng-yìp, ขะL-หฺนมR-ทองM-หฺยิบL, khaL-nohmR-thaawngM-yipL, kà-nǒm-tawng-yìp, ˈkhà ˈnǒm ˈthɔɔŋ ˈyìp, ˈkʰà ˈnǒm ˈtʰɔːŋ ˈjìp, khaL-nomR-thǭŋM-yipL, ˈkà ˈnǒm ˈtorng ˈyìp, khà-nǒm-thawng-yìp, kà-nǒm-tong-yìp, khà-nǒm-thong-yìp]
ขนมทองหยิบ
Golden Flowers

These beatiful flower sculptures are made from the same egg yolk mixture as the shell of the Jackfruit "Seeds" (ขนมเม็ดขนุน, [kà-nǒm-mét-kà-nǔun, kà-nǒm-mét-kà-nǔun, ขะL-หฺนมR-เม็ดH-ขะL-หฺนูนR, khaL-nohmR-metH-khaL-nuunR, kà-nǒm-mét-kà-nǒon, ˈkhà ˈnǒm ˈmét ˈkhà ˈnǔun, ˈkʰà ˈnǒm ˈmét ˈkʰà ˈnǔːn, khaL-nomR-metH-khaL-nūnR, ˈkà ˈnǒm ˈmét ˈkà ˈnǒon, khà-nǒm-mét-khà-nǔun, kà-nǒm-mét-kà-nǒon, khà-nǒm-mét-khà-nǔn]) above.

Crazy Cakes
Crazy Cakes
[kà-nǒm-bâa-bìn, kà-nǒm-bâa-bìn, ขะL-หฺนมR-บ้าF-บิ่นL, khaL-nohmR-baaF-binL, kà-nǒm-bâh-bìn, ˈkhà ˈnǒm ˈbâa ˈbìn, ˈkʰà ˈnǒm ˈbâː ˈbìn, khaL-nomR-bāF-binL, ˈkà ˈnǒm ˈbâh ˈbìn, khà-nǒm-bâa-bìn, kà-nǒm-bâa-bìn, khà-nǒm-bâ-bìn]
ขนมบ้าบิ่น
Crazy Cakes

This dessert, which you will sometimes see as rectangular cakes (top) and sometimes see as little grilled cylindrical coins (bottom), is made from a batter of sticky rice flour, sugar, and other ingredients cooked up on a griddle until the top and bottom are a crispy golden brown. Vendors will sometimes mix in corn or green onions for good measure. Highly addictive. Not the same as the (also addictive) bowl-shaped Thai Griddle Cakes (ขนมครก [kà-nǒm-krók, kà-nǒm-krók, ขะL-หฺนมR-คฺรกH, khaL-nohmR-khrohkH, kà-nǒm-krók, ˈkhà ˈnǒm ˈkhrók, ˈkʰà ˈnǒm ˈkʰrók, khaL-nomR-khrokH, ˈkà ˈnǒm ˈkrók, khà-nǒm-khrók, kà-nǒm-krók, khà-nǒm-khrók]) below.

Some people insist that the small cylindrical coins should instead be called ขนมแป้งจี่ [kà-nǒm-bpɛ̂ɛng-jìi, kà-nǒm-bpɛ̂ɛng-jìi, ขะL-หฺนมR-แป้งF-จี่L, khaL-nohmR-bpaaengF-jeeL, kà-nǒm-pbâeng-jèe, ˈkhà ˈnǒm ˈpɛ̂ɛŋ ˈcìi, ˈkʰà ˈnǒm ˈpɛ̂ːŋ ˈtɕìː, khaL-nomR-pǣŋF-čhīL, ˈkà ˈnǒm ˈbpâirng ˈjèe, khà-nǒm-pâeng-jìi, kà-nǒm-bpâeng-jèe, khà-nǒm-pâeng-chì].

Thai Griddle Cakes
Thai Griddle Cakes
[kà-nǒm-krók, kà-nǒm-krók, ขะL-หฺนมR-คฺรกH, khaL-nohmR-khrohkH, kà-nǒm-krók, ˈkhà ˈnǒm ˈkhrók, ˈkʰà ˈnǒm ˈkʰrók, khaL-nomR-khrokH, ˈkà ˈnǒm ˈkrók, khà-nǒm-khrók, kà-nǒm-krók, khà-nǒm-khrók]
ขนมครก
Thai Griddle Cakes

When you see a street vendor pouring batter into the tell-tale Thai Mortar griddle, you know you are in for a treat. These light, coconut milk- and flour- based griddle cakes should be eaten warm and usually also include green onion or corn.

Sweet Sticky Rice with Coconut Milk
[kà-nǒm-kâao-nǐiao-gà-tí, kà-nǒm-kâao-nǐao-gà-tí, ขะL-หฺนมR-ค่าวF-เหฺนียวR-กะL-ทิH, khaL-nohmR-khaaoF-niaaoR-gaL-thiH, kà-nǒm-kâo-něeo-gà-tí, ˈkhà ˈnǒm ˈkhâaw ˈnǐaw ˈkà ˈthí, ˈkʰà ˈnǒm ˈkʰâːw ˈnǐaw ˈkà ˈtʰí, khaL-nomR-khāoF-nīeoR-kaL-thiH, ˈkà ˈnǒm ˈkâo ˈněe-ao ˈgà ˈtí, khà-nǒm-khâo-nǐaw-kà-thí, kà-nǒm-kâao-nǐeow-gà-tí, khà-nǒm-khâo-nǐao-kà-thí]
ขนมข้าวเหนียวกะทิ
Sweet Sticky Rice with Coconut Milk

Traditional Thai sweet sticky rice topped with a soft mixture of flour, sugar, and coconut milk.

Brown Sticky Rice
[kà-nǒm-kâao-nǐiao-dɛɛng, kà-nǒm-kâao-nǐao-dɛɛng, ขะL-หฺนมR-ค่าวF-เหฺนียวR-แดงM, khaL-nohmR-khaaoF-niaaoR-daaengM, kà-nǒm-kâo-něeo-daeng, ˈkhà ˈnǒm ˈkhâaw ˈnǐaw ˈdɛɛŋ, ˈkʰà ˈnǒm ˈkʰâːw ˈnǐaw ˈdɛːŋ, khaL-nomR-khāoF-nīeoR-dǣŋM, ˈkà ˈnǒm ˈkâo ˈněe-ao ˈdairng, khà-nǒm-khâo-nǐaw-daeng, kà-nǒm-kâao-nǐeow-daeng, khà-nǒm-khâo-nǐao-daeng]
ขนมข้าวเหนียวแดง
Brown Sticky Rice

Sweet sticky rice made from brown rice, it is often cooked less than white sticky rice so that it is almost crunchy, and it is often held together with a thick, marmalade-like sweet jelly.

Jade Sticky Rice
[kà-nǒm-kâao-nǐiao-gɛ̂ɛo, kà-nǒm-kâao-nǐao-gɛ̂ɛo, ขะL-หฺนมR-ค่าวF-เหฺนียวR-แก้วF, khaL-nohmR-khaaoF-niaaoR-gaaeoF, kà-nǒm-kâo-něeo-gâeo, ˈkhà ˈnǒm ˈkhâaw ˈnǐaw ˈkɛ̂ɛw, ˈkʰà ˈnǒm ˈkʰâːw ˈnǐaw ˈkɛ̂ːw, khaL-nomR-khāoF-nīeoR-kǣoF, ˈkà ˈnǒm ˈkâo ˈněe-ao ˈgâir-o, khà-nǒm-khâo-nǐaw-kâew, kà-nǒm-kâao-nǐeow-gâew, khà-nǒm-khâo-nǐao-kâeo]
ขนมข้าวเหนียวแก้ว
Jade Sticky Rice

Cameras simply cannot record the astonishing bright-green glow of this sweet sticky rice, naturally colored and flavored with Pandan leaf (ใบเตย, genus pandanus), and topped with white sesame seeds. The Pandan leaves are blended to a paste and their juice is squeezed through cheesecloth to produce the classic Thai ingredient.

Sweet Sticky Rice with Mango
[kâao-nǐiao-má-mûuang, kâao-nǐao-má-mûang, ค่าวF-เหฺนียวR-มะH-ม่วงF, khaaoF-niaaoR-maH-muaangF, kâo-něeo-má-môoang, ˈkhâaw ˈnǐaw ˈmá ˈmûaŋ, ˈkʰâːw ˈnǐaw ˈmá ˈmûːaŋ, khāoF-nīeoR-maH-mūaŋF, ˈkâo ˈněe-ao ˈmá ˈmôo-ang, khâo-nǐaw-má-mûang, kâao-nǐeow-má-mûang, khâo-nǐao-má-mûang]
ข้าวเหนียวมะม่วง
Sweet Sticky Rice with Mango

One of the most famous Thai desserts and one of the only ones you are likely to find in Thai restaurants in the West. It consists of traditional steamed Thai sweet sticky rice (ข้าวเหนียวมูน, [kâao-nǐiao-muun, kâao-nǐao-muun, ค่าวF-เหฺนียวR-มูนM, khaaoF-niaaoR-muunM, kâo-něeo-moon, ˈkhâaw ˈnǐaw ˈmuun, ˈkʰâːw ˈnǐaw ˈmuːn, khāoF-nīeoR-mūnM, ˈkâo ˈněe-ao ˈmoon, khâo-nǐaw-muun, kâao-nǐeow-moon, khâo-nǐao-mun]) topped with slices of fresh mango and sweetened coconut milk. [Image stolen without permission from the wacky and entertaining oishiieats blog, at least until I can get a decent photo].

Sweet Black Sticky Rice with Thai Custard
[kâao-nǐiao-dam-sǎng-kà-yǎa, kâao-nǐao-dam-sǎng-kà-yǎa, ค่าวF-เหฺนียวR-ดัมM-สังR-ขะL-หฺยาR, khaaoF-niaaoR-damM-sangR-khaL-yaaR, kâo-něeo-dam-sǎng-kà-yǎh, ˈkhâaw ˈnǐaw ˈdam ˈsǎŋ ˈkhà ˈyǎa, ˈkʰâːw ˈnǐaw ˈdam ˈsǎŋ ˈkʰà ˈjǎː, khāoF-nīeoR-damM-saŋR-khaL-yāR, ˈkâo ˈněe-ao ˈdum ˈsǔng ˈkà ˈyǎh, khâo-nǐaw-dam-sǎng-khà-yǎa, kâao-nǐeow-dam-sǎng-kà-yǎa, khâo-nǐao-dam-sǎng-khà-yǎ]
ข้าวเหนียวดำสังขยา
Sweet Black Sticky Rice with Thai Custard

Odd-looking but yummy, this is a layer of black sticky rice topped with famous Thai custard. The black sticky rice is mildly sweet with roughly the texture of tapioca pudding.

Steamed Sticky Rice Pouches with Filling
Steamed Sticky Rice Pouches with Filling
[kâao-dtôm-mát, kâao-dtôm-mát, ค่าวF-ต้มF-มัดH, khaaoF-dtohmF-matH, kâo-dtôm-mát, ˈkhâaw ˈtôm ˈmát, ˈkʰâːw ˈtôm ˈmát, khāoF-tomF-matH, ˈkâo ˈdtôm ˈmút, khâo-tôm-mát, kâao-dtôm-mát, khâo-tôm-mát]
ข้าวต้มมัด
Steamed Sticky Rice Pouches with Filling

Easy to miss in the market, this dessert is sold all bundled up in a steamed (and thus lighter-green) banana leaf which is ingeniously tied with "string" made of shaved bamboo (top picture). Hiding inside (bottom picture) is some delicious Thai sweet sticky rice (ข้าวเหนียวมูน, [kâao-nǐiao-muun, kâao-nǐao-muun, ค่าวF-เหฺนียวR-มูนM, khaaoF-niaaoR-muunM, kâo-něeo-moon, ˈkhâaw ˈnǐaw ˈmuun, ˈkʰâːw ˈnǐaw ˈmuːn, khāoF-nīeoR-mūnM, ˈkâo ˈněe-ao ˈmoon, khâo-nǐaw-muun, kâao-nǐeow-moon, khâo-nǐao-mun]) with a filling that includes one or more (usually one) of banana, black bean, or tarot.

Thai Custard with Pumpkin
[kà-nǒm-sǎng-kà-yǎa-fák-tɔɔng, kà-nǒm-sǎng-kà-yǎa-fák-tɔɔng, ขะL-หฺนมR-สังR-ขะL-หฺยาR-ฟักH-ทองM, khaL-nohmR-sangR-khaL-yaaR-fakH-thaawngM, kà-nǒm-sǎng-kà-yǎh-fák-tawng, ˈkhà ˈnǒm ˈsǎŋ ˈkhà ˈyǎa ˈfák ˈthɔɔŋ, ˈkʰà ˈnǒm ˈsǎŋ ˈkʰà ˈjǎː ˈfák ˈtʰɔːŋ, khaL-nomR-saŋR-khaL-yāR-fakH-thǭŋM, ˈkà ˈnǒm ˈsǔng ˈkà ˈyǎh ˈfúk ˈtorng, khà-nǒm-sǎng-khà-yǎa-fák-thawng, kà-nǒm-sǎng-kà-yǎa-fák-tong, khà-nǒm-sǎng-khà-yǎ-fák-thong]
ขนมสังขยาฟักทอง
Thai Custard with Pumpkin

Classic Thai egg custard topped with pumpkin shavings.

Pumpkin with Thai Custard
[kà-nǒm-fák-tɔɔng-sǎng-kà-yǎa, kà-nǒm-fák-tɔɔng-sǎng-kà-yǎa, ขะL-หฺนมR-ฟักH-ทองM-สังR-ขะL-หฺยาR, khaL-nohmR-fakH-thaawngM-sangR-khaL-yaaR, kà-nǒm-fák-tawng-sǎng-kà-yǎh, ˈkhà ˈnǒm ˈfák ˈthɔɔŋ ˈsǎŋ ˈkhà ˈyǎa, ˈkʰà ˈnǒm ˈfák ˈtʰɔːŋ ˈsǎŋ ˈkʰà ˈjǎː, khaL-nomR-fakH-thǭŋM-saŋR-khaL-yāR, ˈkà ˈnǒm ˈfúk ˈtorng ˈsǔng ˈkà ˈyǎh, khà-nǒm-fák-thawng-sǎng-khà-yǎa, kà-nǒm-fák-tong-sǎng-kà-yǎa, khà-nǒm-fák-thong-sǎng-khà-yǎ]
ขนมฟักทองสังขยา
Pumpkin with Thai Custard

A slice of fresh Pumpkin stuffed with classic Thai egg custard.

Banana Dessert
[kà-nǒm-glûai, kà-nǒm-glûai, ขะL-หฺนมR-กฺล้วยISF, khaL-nohmR-gluayF, kà-nǒm-glûay, ˈkhà ˈnǒm ˈklûay, ˈkʰà ˈnǒm ˈklûaj, khaL-nomR-kluaiF, ˈkà ˈnǒm ˈglôo-ai, khà-nǒm-klûay, kà-nǒm-glûay, khà-nǒm-klûai]
ขนมกล้วย
Banana Dessert

A delicious custard-like sweet that is made with bananas and sugar, topped with coconut flakes. This dessert is often sold in tiny, chilled ceramic cups or wrapped in banana leaf.

Palm Heart Puff
[kà-nǒm-lûuk-dtaan, kà-nǒm-lûuk-dtaan, ขะL-หฺนมR-ลูกF-ตานM, khaL-nohmR-luukF-dtaanM, kà-nǒm-lôok-dtahn, ˈkhà ˈnǒm ˈlûuk ˈtaan, ˈkʰà ˈnǒm ˈlûːk ˈtaːn, khaL-nomR-lūkF-tānM, ˈkà ˈnǒm ˈlôok ˈdtahn, khà-nǒm-lûuk-taan, kà-nǒm-lôok-dtaan, khà-nǒm-lûk-tan]
ขนมลูกตาล
[kà-nǒm-dtaan, kà-nǒm-dtaan, ขะL-หฺนมR-ตานM, khaL-nohmR-dtaanM, kà-nǒm-dtahn, ˈkhà ˈnǒm ˈtaan, ˈkʰà ˈnǒm ˈtaːn, khaL-nomR-tānM, ˈkà ˈnǒm ˈdtahn, khà-nǒm-taan, kà-nǒm-dtaan, khà-nǒm-tan]
ขนมตาล
Palm Heart Puff

It looks, feels, and tastes like a bready Western flour cake, but it's not: it's made from steamed palm hearts (specifically from the Toddy Palm, ต้นตาล, Borassus flabellifer Linn.) that provide the natural color and flavor, with a little coconut sprinkled on top.

Rice Flour Cup
[kà-nǒm-dtà-gôo, kà-nǒm-dtà-gôo, ขะL-หฺนมR-ตะL-โก้F, khaL-nohmR-dtaL-go:hF, kà-nǒm-dtà-gôh, ˈkhà ˈnǒm ˈtà ˈkôo, ˈkʰà ˈnǒm ˈtà ˈkôː, khaL-nomR-taL-kōF, ˈkà ˈnǒm ˈdtà ˈgôh, khà-nǒm-tà-kôh, kà-nǒm-dtà-gôh, khà-nǒm-tà-kô]
ขนมตะโก้
Rice Flour Cup

A surprisingly tasty little morsel made from rice flower and sugar, ingeniously and beautifully folded into a square package (the staple being a modern substitute for the more traditional wood splinter or toothpick).

Yummy Tar
[kà-nǒm-bpìiak-bpuun, kà-nǒm-bpìak-bpuun, ขะL-หฺนมR-เปียกL-ปูนM, khaL-nohmR-bpiiakL-bpuunM, kà-nǒm-pbèeak-pboon, ˈkhà ˈnǒm ˈpìak ˈpuun, ˈkʰà ˈnǒm ˈpìːak ˈpuːn, khaL-nomR-pīakL-pūnM, ˈkà ˈnǒm ˈbpèe-ak ˈbpoon, khà-nǒm-pìak-puun, kà-nǒm-bpìak-bpoon, khà-nǒm-pìak-pun]
ขนมเปียกปูน
Yummy Tar

It may look like tar, or the obelisk from 2001: A Space Odyssey (the Thai translates literally as "Wet Concrete" or "Concrete Paste"), but it's all-natural and surprisingly tasty. The chef starts by burning the outer shell of coconuts, soaking the resulting char in water, and then squeezing it through cheesecloth to produce a natural black coloring and a unique flavoring, which is then combined with sugar and coconut milk to make the dessert.

Bean Cake
[kà-nǒm-tùua-guuan, kà-nǒm-tùa-guan, ขะL-หฺนมR-ถั่วL-กวนM, khaL-nohmR-thuaaL-guaanM, kà-nǒm-tòoa-gooan, ˈkhà ˈnǒm ˈthùa ˈkuan, ˈkʰà ˈnǒm ˈtʰùːa ˈkuːan, khaL-nomR-thūaL-kūanM, ˈkà ˈnǒm ˈtòo-a ˈgoo-an, khà-nǒm-thùa-kuan, kà-nǒm-tùa-guan, khà-nǒm-thùa-kuan]
ขนมถั่วกวน
Bean Cake

A very slightly sweet cake made from crushed beans (could be soybeans, mung beans, or other types).

Some people seem to refer to this dessert as ขนมถั่วตัด [kà-nǒm-tùua-dtàt, kà-nǒm-tùa-dtàt, ขะL-หฺนมR-ถั่วL-ตัดL, khaL-nohmR-thuaaL-dtatL, kà-nǒm-tòoa-dtàt, ˈkhà ˈnǒm ˈthùa ˈtàt, ˈkʰà ˈnǒm ˈtʰùːa ˈtàt, khaL-nomR-thūaL-tatL, ˈkà ˈnǒm ˈtòo-a ˈdtùt, khà-nǒm-thùa-tàt, kà-nǒm-tùa-dtàt, khà-nǒm-thùa-tàt], though see below.

Sweet Peanut Cracker
[kà-nǒm-tùua-dtàt, kà-nǒm-tùa-dtàt, ขะL-หฺนมR-ถั่วL-ตัดL, khaL-nohmR-thuaaL-dtatL, kà-nǒm-tòoa-dtàt, ˈkhà ˈnǒm ˈthùa ˈtàt, ˈkʰà ˈnǒm ˈtʰùːa ˈtàt, khaL-nomR-thūaL-tatL, ˈkà ˈnǒm ˈtòo-a ˈdtùt, khà-nǒm-thùa-tàt, kà-nǒm-tùa-dtàt, khà-nǒm-thùa-tàt]
ขนมถั่วตัด
Sweet Peanut Cracker

Similar to peanut brittle from the US or chikki from India, and looking like a sheet of brown glass, this is a hard cracker of sugar with lots of peanuts and white sesame on it.

Photo courtesy of Nuti Damrongphatr.

Shan Bread Pudding
[kà-nǒm-bpeeng-móong, kà-nǒm-bpeeng-móong, ขะL-หฺนมR-เปงM-โม้งH, khaL-nohmR-bpaehngM-mo:hngH, kà-nǒm-pbayng-móhng, ˈkhà ˈnǒm ˈpeeŋ ˈmóoŋ, ˈkʰà ˈnǒm ˈpeːŋ ˈmóːŋ, khaL-nomR-pēŋM-mōŋH, ˈkà ˈnǒm ˈbpayng ˈmóhng, khà-nǒm-pehng-móhng, kà-nǒm-bpayng-móhng, khà-nǒm-peng-móng]
ขนมเปงโม้ง
Shan Bread Pudding

Perhaps my favorite dessert of them all, this traditional Shan (Thai Yai) dessert can be found in Northern Thailand (for example, in Pai). It has several delicious, egg-based layers with a bread-pudding-like, bubbly texture, topped with a sweet, creamy frosting. Unlike most desserts of its type, it retains just the right level of moistness that you can eat it without a drink, and it is not too sweet either.

Shan Custard
[kà-nǒm-à-laa-wàa, kà-nǒm-à-laa-wàa, ขะL-หฺนมR-อะL-ลาM-หฺว่าL, khaL-nohmR-aL-laaM-waaL, kà-nǒm-à-lah-wàh, ˈkhà ˈnǒm ˈʔà ˈlaa ˈwàa, ˈkʰà ˈnǒm ˈʔà ˈlaː ˈwàː, khaL-nomR-ʿaL-lāM-wāL, ˈkà ˈnǒm ˈà ˈlah ˈwàh, khà-nǒm-à-laa-wàa, kà-nǒm-à-laa-wàa, khà-nǒm-à-la-wà]
ขนมอะลาหว่า
Shan Custard

Another traditional Shan (Thai Yai) dessert that can be found in Northern Thailand (for example, in Pai). A smooth and delicious custard that is braised on top.

Puffy Rice Patty
Puffy Rice Patty
Puffy Rice Patty
[kâao-bpúk, kâao-bpúk, ค่าวF-ปุ๊กH, khaaoF-bpookH, kâo-pbóok, ˈkhâaw ˈpúk, ˈkʰâːw ˈpúk, khāoF-pukH, ˈkâo ˈbpÓOk, khâo-púk, kâao-bpúk, khâo-púk]
ข้าวปุ๊ก
[kâao-bpùk, kâao-bpùk, ค่าวF-ปุกL, khaaoF-bpookL, kâo-pbòok, ˈkhâaw ˈpùk, ˈkʰâːw ˈpùk, khāoF-pukL, ˈkâo ˈbpÒOk, khâo-pùk, kâao-bpùk, khâo-pùk]
ข้าวปุก
Puffy Rice Patty

A sweet, chewy delight. A thin, round purple patty made from black sticky rice is toasted over an open flame until it puffs up (hence ปุ๊ก, [bpúk, bpúk, ปุ๊กH, bpookH, pbóok, ˈpúk, ˈpúk, pukH, ˈbpÓOk, púk, bpúk, púk], which means "plump" or "chubby," which then for no explained reason got corrupted to ปุก, [bpùk, bpùk, ปุกL, bpookL, pbòok, ˈpùk, ˈpùk, pukL, ˈbpÒOk, pùk, bpùk, pùk]), topped with black sesame seeds, brown sugar, and sweetened condensed milk, and then folded and snipped with scissors into bite-sized pieces. You can find this dessert in Northern Thailand (for example, in Pai), where it is traditionally made by the Chinese (actually KMT) immigrants from Yunnan during the cold season. The Lisu hill tribe makes a thicker variety of ข้าวปุ๊ก, [kâao-bpúk, kâao-bpúk, ค่าวF-ปุ๊กH, khaaoF-bpookH, kâo-pbóok, ˈkhâaw ˈpúk, ˈkʰâːw ˈpúk, khāoF-pukH, ˈkâo ˈbpÓOk, khâo-púk, kâao-bpúk, khâo-púk] out of white sticky rice. The Shan (Thai Yai) immigrants make a similar snack out of black sticky rice during the rice harvest season, but they mix in the black sesame seeds before cooking.

Flirt Dumplings
[kà-nǒm-jìip, kà-nǒm-jìip, ขะL-หฺนมR-จีบL, khaL-nohmR-jeepL, kà-nǒm-jèep, ˈkhà ˈnǒm ˈcìip, ˈkʰà ˈnǒm ˈtɕìːp, khaL-nomR-čhīpL, ˈkà ˈnǒm ˈjèep, khà-nǒm-jìip, kà-nǒm-jèep, khà-nǒm-chìp]
ขนมจีบ
Flirt Dumplings

These delicious yellow steamed dumplings (also found in green color) are filled with pork and vegetables and topped with Thai chili peppers, green onions, and crunchy fried garlic. They could equally well qualify as an appetizer or a dessert.

Noodle Rolls
[gǔai-dtǐiao-lɔ̀ɔt, gǔai-dtǐao-lɔ̀ɔt, ก๋วยISR-เตี๋ยวR-หฺลอดL, guayR-dtiaaoR-laawtL, gǔay-dtěeo-làwt, ˈkǔay ˈtǐaw ˈlɔ̀ɔt, ˈkǔaj ˈtǐaw ˈlɔ̀ːt, kuaiR-tīeoR-lǭtL, ˈgǒo-ai ˈdtěe-ao ˈlòrt, kǔay-tǐaw-làwt, gǔay-dtǐeow-lòt, kǔai-tǐao-lòt]
ก๋วยเตี๋ยวหลอด
Noodle Rolls

Similar in shape and appearance to Vietnamese fresh spring rolls, these steamed dumplings are made of sheets of the same dough used to make the wide Thai noodle soup noodles (before the sheets are cut into noodles), and the ingredients are similar to those you might find in a Thai noodle soup: sprouts, herbs, and other vegetables. The rolls are topped with Thai chili peppers, green onions, and crunchy fried garlic. They could equally well qualify as an appetizer or a dessert.

Unripe Rice Dessert
[kà-nǒm-kâao-mâao, kà-nǒm-kâao-mâao, ขะL-หฺนมR-ค่าวF-ม่าวF, khaL-nohmR-khaaoF-maaoF, kà-nǒm-kâo-mâo, ˈkhà ˈnǒm ˈkhâaw ˈmâaw, ˈkʰà ˈnǒm ˈkʰâːw ˈmâːw, khaL-nomR-khāoF-māoF, ˈkà ˈnǒm ˈkâo ˈmâo, khà-nǒm-khâo-mâo, kà-nǒm-kâao-mâao, khà-nǒm-khâo-mâo]
ขนมข้าวเม่า
Unripe Rice Dessert

This dessert is made from a very unusual ingredient, ข้าวเม่า, [kâao-mâao, kâao-mâao, ค่าวF-ม่าวF, khaaoF-maaoF, kâo-mâo, ˈkhâaw ˈmâaw, ˈkʰâːw ˈmâːw, khāoF-māoF, ˈkâo ˈmâo, khâo-mâo, kâao-mâao, khâo-mâo], which is produced by taking unripe sticky rice seeds, roasting them, and then pounding off the husks. The resulting form of rice can be made into many desserts. The one pictured here is colored green by Pandan leaf (ใบเตย, genus pandanus) with coconut flakes. By itself, the dessert is quite bland, but when you add the provided natural sugar, it is quite tasty.

Little Cup Dessert
[kà-nǒm-tûai, kà-nǒm-tûai, ขะL-หฺนมR-ท่วยISF, khaL-nohmR-thuayF, kà-nǒm-tûay, ˈkhà ˈnǒm ˈthûay, ˈkʰà ˈnǒm ˈtʰûaj, khaL-nomR-thuaiF, ˈkà ˈnǒm ˈtôo-ai, khà-nǒm-thûay, kà-nǒm-tûay, khà-nǒm-thûai]
ขนมถ้วย
Little Cup Dessert

This dessert consists of one or two layers of tasty sweet rice-flour based pudding, poured and set in little spoon-sized bowls. You may still see the bowls on display or just see bowl-shaped desserts like the picture here.

Candle Dessert
Candle Dessert
[kà-nǒm-tiian, kà-nǒm-tian, ขะL-หฺนมR-เทียนM, khaL-nohmR-thiianM, kà-nǒm-teean, ˈkhà ˈnǒm ˈthian, ˈkʰà ˈnǒm ˈtʰiːan, khaL-nomR-thīanM, ˈkà ˈnǒm ˈtee-an, khà-nǒm-thian, kà-nǒm-tian, khà-nǒm-thian]
ขนมเทียน
Candle Dessert

When you see the tell-tale, beautiful pyramid packages, you can be fairly certain it's this dessert. Inside the package is a very sticky, blobby outer shell made from sticky rice flour, and inside that is either sweet filling (including coconut, sugar, and sesame seed) or salty filling (including black pepper, peanuts, salt, and other ingredients). The Thais seem to favor the salty filling, which is harder to make.

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See AlsoYou'll probably also like these sites...
allaboutpai.com
A site about Pai, my peaceful home in the mountains of Northern Thailand.
lurkertech: video tech and diversions
Buzzword bingo, bill the borg, MEZ, lurker's guide to video, and Thai, oh my!
mapfling.com: free custom maps with your own labels
Party? Meeting? Request a map, label it yourself, and easily fling it to your friends!
world's stupidest everything
See some of the worst the world has to offer, and add some of your own!
thailand your way
Travel with my friend Nang, who is a great nature, birding, and cultural guide.
jeed illustration
My English-fluent Thai friend Jeed is a freelance illustrator who is available for hire.
CopyrightEntire website copyright 1999-2017 Chris Pirazzi unless otherwise indicated.

License for use:

Support This Site

I work on this site in my off hours. Please help me to push aside my day job and work on it more by supporting the site in one of these ways:
donate now   Donate Now
Use your credit card or PayPal to donate in support of the site.
get my thai dictionary app
Learn Thai with my Talking Thai-English-Thai Dictionary app: iOS, Android, Windows.
get my thai phrasebook app
Experience Thailand richly with my Talking Thai-English-Thai Phrasebook app.
get my chinese phrasebook app
Visit China easily with my Talking Chinese-English-Chinese Phrasebook app.
get thailand fever
I co-authored this bilingual cultural guide to Thai-Western romantic relationships.
get books or almost anything
Pick a Thai learning book from my list or buy anything at all from Amazon.
See Also

You'll probably also like these sites...
allaboutpai.com
A site about Pai, my peaceful home in the mountains of Northern Thailand.
lurkertech: video tech and diversions
Buzzword bingo, bill the borg, MEZ, lurker's guide to video, and Thai, oh my!
mapfling.com: free custom maps with your own labels
Party? Meeting? Request a map, label it yourself, and easily fling it to your friends!
world's stupidest everything
See some of the worst the world has to offer, and add some of your own!
thailand your way
Travel with my friend Nang, who is a great nature, birding, and cultural guide.
jeed illustration
My English-fluent Thai friend Jeed is a freelance illustrator who is available for hire.
Copyright

Entire website copyright 1999-2017 Chris Pirazzi unless otherwise indicated.

License for use: